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Features of Nevada Sportsbooks

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Millions of people visit sportsbooks in Las Vegas and Reno each year. Some people come specifically to bet on sports while others stop into sportsbooks for a few minutes on their way to the poker room or the slot machines. Sportsbooks can range from being little more than a hole in the wall with just a few folding chairs and a pair of televisions that show games to extremely lavish, such as the Westgate’s SuperBook, which has more than 350 seats and 60 television monitors, including a theater-sized 20-foot by 15-foot monitor and its Ultimate Fan Cave, which can show up to 16 games at once on high-definition televisions.

For sports fans, sportsbooks can be an ideal place to catch their favorite games with other fans and get a little bit of action on the games. The camaraderie with other bettors is one of the main attractions for many bettors, who enjoy having a kindred spirit during the game and those who have wagered on the same teams have a tendency of being drawn towards each other and it’s not unusual to see strangers “high-fiving” each other when something good happens.
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While watching a game at a sportsbook, it’s easy to make bets on games. All sportsbooks have cashiers who are available to collect bets and pay out winning wagers. Some sportsbooks have also started experimenting with self-service sports betting options. Similar to what is found at horse racing tracks, these betting kiosks let people place bets using a touch-screen system.

Watching a game at a large sportsbook is comfortable and has its perks. Most casinos offer complimentary drinks to people in the sportsbook who are watching games that they have bets on and many let you earn player’s club points with each wager, which can be redeemed for discounts on rooms and food. One thing that has changed in recent years is that customers are allowed to use their cell phones at sportsbooks – a previous ban on cell phone usage was overturned in 2008.